Butler High senior stays connected to heritage

By Leah Schmalz

Conor Quinlivan, left, hugs his mother at the Trish Quinlivan at the World Irish Dance Championship qualifying event.

Conor Quinlivan, left, hugs his mother at the Trish Quinlivan at the World Irish Dance Championship qualifying event.

Conor Quinlivan, a senior at Butler High School, is a successful Irish dancer and novice hockey player. While the two activities may seem quite different, they’re both reflections of his family and heritage.

Quinlivan began learning Irish dance at the age of four. His mother, who was born in Ireland, got him involved. Throughout his 13 years of dancing, Quinlivan has taken part in state and international competitions. While he was overseas to compete in the World Irish Dance Championships, he was able to stay with aunt and explore Ireland, including the town where his mother was born. “I got to see all of my family,” he said. “We went to different towns and ventured all around.”

December was a busy month for Quinlivan. In addition to placing eighth in the qualifying event for the World Irish Dance Championship, he also started playing ice hockey. While Quinlivan’s father is also Irish, he was born in New York. As a result, both of them are fans of the New York Rangers NHL team. Quinlivan’s love for hockey prompted him to learn the sport, and he enjoys playing.

In the fall, Quinlivan plans to attend Central Piedmont Community College. While he will continue dancing and playing hockey, he wants to major in special education. He’s worked at Camp SOAR at the Levine Jewish Community Center and enjoys it. “My sister has been involved with special needs. She brought me to one of the special needs camps and I was hooked,” he said.

Quinlivan had the chance to attend a different high school, but looking back he wouldn’t change a thing. “I’m glad I ended up staying at Butler because the faculty and staff were amazing to me,” he said. “I had a great time.”

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Principal John LeGrand transitions from Bain to Butler

By Leah Schmalz

John LeGrand, named Principal of the Year in the East Learning Community this year, is in the process of transitioning from Bain Elementary to Butler High School for the next academic year.

John LeGrand, named Principal of the Year in the East Learning Community this year, is in the process of transitioning from Bain Elementary to Butler High School for the next academic year.

John LeGrand is in a unique position as he makes the transition from principal of Bain Elementary to principal of Butler High School. Some of the students who attended Bain Elementary during his first year in 2008 are now freshmen and sophomores at Butler. “Each class going forward for the next several years will have the kids that I worked with here at Bain also. There’s a familiarity factor there that’s going to make this transition much easier for me,” he said.

 

LeGrand has served as principal of Bain Elementary for six years. This year he was named Principal of the Year in the East Learning Community, a zone that includes schools like Independence, Butler and Bain.  Continue reading

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Girl Scouts charm their way to sales

By Michele Dotson

Girl Scouts

(from left to right) Maddy Hillman, Marissa McDougald, and Jenna Oldja advertise their Girl Scout cookies on Saturday, March 8 at the corner of Hwy. 51 and Lawyers Road. Hillman and McDougald are students at Union Academy. Oldja attends Porter Ridge. The girls are from Troop 140 in Indian Trail.

We see them at work, at church, and even at our doors. Those adorable Girl Scouts with their green uniforms; badges proudly displayed, who whip out pen and order form with lightning speed.

“Would you like to buy some Girl Scout cookies?”

Who can resist them?

Not many of us, evidently.

Nationally the Girl Scout cookie industry has turned into an annual $800 million affair. Continue reading

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Blessed Assurance breaks ground on new addition

By Michele Dotson
Blessed Assurance

Blessed Assurance’s Nate Huggins is joined by Town of Matthews Mayor, Jim Taylor and Rep Bill Brawley in a ground breaking ceremony at the facility.

Spend five minutes with Nate Huggins and you’ll understand the need for adult day care in the Mint Hill area. Spend 10 minutes with him, and you’ll likely be signed up for the upcoming golf tournament or helping the cause in some other way.

The passion he has for the adults and their caregivers is his driving force, and that determination to provide services for families has led to the recent approval of an expansion to the Blessed Assurance Adult Day Care Center. Continue reading

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Free medical clinic to benefit from fundraiser lunch

Matthews free Clinic is located at 196 South Trade Street, Matthews, NC. They relo- cated to this larger space to meet the growing demand for healthcare for uninsured resi- dents of Mecklen- burg and Union Counties.

Matthews free Clinic is located at 196 South Trade Street, Matthews, NC. They relo- cated to this larger space to meet the growing demand for healthcare for uninsured resi- dents of Mecklen- burg and Union Counties.

Dunwells Custom Kitchen and Pour House will host a fundraising lunch on Wednesday, September 18 from 11 am to 3 pm at 7110 Brighton Park Drive in Mint Hill. The restaurant will donate 20 percent of all sales to the Matthews Free Medical Clinic, which serves uninsured patients from anywhere in Mecklenburg and Union Counties.

The clinic had very humble beginnings back in February 2004. Patients were seen one evening a week under the direction of

Lou Ann McAdams, MD, Medical Director, and Gail Dokes, RN, Executive Director. Operating costs for the clinic’s first year were donated by Matthews United Methodist Church along with individual donors. Continue reading

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Mint Hill represented at Matthews Alive

Matthews alive 1

Pottery 51 artisan Althea Meade- Hadjuk wraps up a sale for a customer Saturday. Right: The Independence High School marching band, under the direc- tion of Christopher Moreau, was a crowd pleaser.

Pottery 51 artisan Althea Meade- Hadjuk wraps up a sale for a customer Saturday. Right: The Independence High School marching band, under the direc- tion of Christopher Moreau, was a crowd pleaser.

The crowds were out at Matthews Alive, the annual Labor Day weekend family arts and crafts festival in down- town Matthews that draws more than 200,000 attendees each year and con- tinues to grow. Independence High School, Blessed Assurance and the Matthews-Mint Hill Indian Guides marched in the parade. Local potter Althea Meade-Hadjuk was one of the featured artists in the Hendrick Arts and Crafts Pavilion, and artist Bar- bara Travell’s work was exhibited in the new McDowell Arts Center.

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