Election time draws near

Election day will soon be here, and there a few things to remember before heading out to the polls on November 5.
First, the deadline to register to vote in North Carolina is 25 days before the day of the election, so be sure that you are registered by October 11 if you plan to vote on November 5.╩
Voter registration forms are located on line and at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections and should be received by the county board of elections office or postmarked by the deadline in order to be accepted as valid applications for the upcoming election.
Also, agency and DMV voter registration transactions that are completed by the deadline are accepted as valid for the upcoming election. Applicants will be notified by the county board of elections of their precinct and polling place assignments, or you can use the on line application to locate our polling place by searching your address. Continue reading
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Free medical clinic to benefit from fundraiser lunch

Matthews free Clinic is located at 196 South Trade Street, Matthews, NC. They relo- cated to this larger space to meet the growing demand for healthcare for uninsured resi- dents of Mecklen- burg and Union Counties.

Matthews free Clinic is located at 196 South Trade Street, Matthews, NC. They relo- cated to this larger space to meet the growing demand for healthcare for uninsured resi- dents of Mecklen- burg and Union Counties.

Dunwells Custom Kitchen and Pour House will host a fundraising lunch on Wednesday, September 18 from 11 am to 3 pm at 7110 Brighton Park Drive in Mint Hill. The restaurant will donate 20 percent of all sales to the Matthews Free Medical Clinic, which serves uninsured patients from anywhere in Mecklenburg and Union Counties.

The clinic had very humble beginnings back in February 2004. Patients were seen one evening a week under the direction of

Lou Ann McAdams, MD, Medical Director, and Gail Dokes, RN, Executive Director. Operating costs for the clinic’s first year were donated by Matthews United Methodist Church along with individual donors. Continue reading

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Mint Hill, Mecklenburg resolve fire tax overpayment

By Derek Lacey / Staff Writer

Mint Hill town staff and Mecklenburg County staff have come to an agreement to remedy the overpayment made by the County for the fire service district tax.

The solution would defray the approximately $176,000 overpayment made to the town from the county, due to a miscalculation in projected tax revenue from Mint Hill’s extraterritorial jurisdiction, or ETJ, which the county estimated at $500,000, but which turned out to be only around $276,000.

The overpayment would be defrayed against a payment of $175,000 which was made to the county by the town a few years ago, to keep the Mint Hill branch library afloat.

Both Bobbie Shields, interim Mecklenburg County manager and Brian Welch, Mint Hill town manager, have been authorized to enter into the agreement to defray the payment by their respective boards.

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State of the town: a Q & A update with Mayor Ted Biggers

Ted Biggers has served as Mint Hill mayor for 14 years. He is an airline pilot with U.S. Airways and has been with the airline since 1980, when he finished seven and a half years of service in the U.S. Air Force. He answered a few questions for us about ongoing town business for a quick update on Mint Hill.

Q: The 2014 Mint Hill budget just passed. What do you think of it?

A: I was really happy that we didn’t have to go up on taxes. As you probably have noticed, a lot of the surrounding government entities have had to raise taxes, and I think it’s always an accomplishment-an admirable accomplishment-when a board can present a balanced budget and keep from raising taxes.

Q: Mecklenburg County has been making your job a little more interesting with revaluation and the fire tax overpayment. What’s the town doing with those issues and how is it affecting the town’s day-to-day operations?

A: It really hasn’t had a major effect on our day-to-day operations, because our budgeting has been so conservative and our town manager has done such a good job with the budget, it really hasn’t adversely affected us other than having to work with the two fire departments, Mint Hill Volunteer Fire Department and Idlewild Fire Department, to make sure that they’re properly funded and that it didn’t hurt their operations. I believe through Brian’s (Welch) efforts, and working with their fire chiefs and boards, that we have been able to achieve that, and that’s been the only problem. The revaluation, we’re going to lose some revenue because of that, but we’re also gaining some revenue in other areas because it looks like the building industry is slowly coming back also. We’ve actually got a good number of new homes going up in Mint Hill and hopefully within the next 12 to 24 months, we’ll see some action out of the mall site.

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Mint Hill commissioners work through power outage at meeting

The Mint Hill Board of Commissioner worked through stormy conditions and a long power outage to hold a public hearing for the 2014 budget, hear an update on a proposed development and appoint new members to town boards, among other business.

The Board of Commissioners adopted the 2014 budget, as recommended by the town manager, Brian Welch, at the last budget workshop meeting. The finished budget came out balanced, and tax rates and vehicle tag fees will remain the same.

During the public hearing for the budget, Dale Dalton was the only speaker from the public, saying, “I just want to thank Brian and the Board for coming up with out budget and not raising taxes or anything, I think you ought to be commended for what you’ve done.”

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BOC hears presentations on roundabout, fire tax

The Mint Hill Board of Commissioners and Mint Hill residents were updated on two important town issues at the meeting last Thursday, May 9.

Scott Cole, Division Traffic Engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation gave a presentation about roundabouts, and specifically the proposed roundabout to be built at the intersection of N.C. Hwy. 51 and Idlewild Road in Mint Hill.

Cole cited the main concerns for the construction of the roundabout, the same as the main concerns for any roundabout, are traffic efficiency and safety.

According to Cole, roundabouts are the safest intersection, can provide for high capacity and low delay, is good for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, motorcycles, bicycles, cars, and large trucks, has a geometric flexibility to fit in any location, and the aesthetic appeal.

For safety, Cole said that a regular intersection has 32 conflict points, or places where a collision is likely to occur, and that a roundabout has only 8, and provides for slower speeds and better angles.

Cole said that typical crash reductions following installation of roundabouts in rural areas of the United States could be as high as 74 percent.

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