Adventures and history in herbs

by Derek Lacey / Staff Writer

The herb garden at the Carl J. McEwen Historic Village. The doctor’s museum is in the background. PHOTO BY DEREK LACEY

The herb garden at the Carl J. McEwen Historic Village. The doctor’s museum is in the background. PHOTO BY DEREK LACEY

 

At the Carl J. McEwen Historic Village, right next to the Doctor’s Museum, which showcases historical medicinal techniques, there sits a small herb garden.

Roses, Foxglove, Thyme, sage, lavender, oregano, peppermint, and even catnip all grow in the garden, and all have medicinal properties and were once used by doctors.

In 1997, Virginia Frazier helped a Girl Scout, Blair Gutledge, with her project, an herb garden at the Mint Hill Historical Society.

After Gutledge grew out of girl scouts and moved on, Virginia and her daughter Brenda Dills would resurrect the neglected herb garden every year, to keep the plants growing and healthy. They decided it would be smarter and easier to just maintain the garden themselves, which they still do today.

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Spring (gardening) is in the air

Garden

It’s official. As of Wednesday, March 20, spring has arrived. That means enjoying the warm weather by getting outside and starting a new garden or changing up the landscape around the house.

And if you’re a beginner, a veteran, or just trying to supplement your grocery bill by growing your tomatoes and squash in your backyard, here are some tips and ideas to keep in mind when shrugging off that winter dreariness.

Bob Prophit, general manager at King’s Greenhouse in Stallings, offers up his expertise for people wanting to get growing this spring.

Getting a garden going has no shortage of benefits, and these days people get started for a number of reasons.

Sustainability, fresh produce, and stress release are all on that list, and even general health is a consideration.

“Gardening is good for you,” said Prophit. “Just in general, especially if you work in an office all the time. I mean, that’s a release, you get to go out and work. It’s healthy, you’re not sitting around, most gardeners are just happy; they’re doing something.”

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Farmer’s market takes fresh look at helping local farmers and missions

Founders Leconte Lee and Nick Knock sell produce at the first go-go fresco, a weekly “pop-up” farmer’s market, designed to benefit local farmers and nonprofit missions. PHOTO BY DEREK LACEY

Founders Leconte Lee and Nick Knock sell produce at the first go-go fresco, a weekly “pop-up” farmer’s market, designed to benefit local farmers and nonprofit missions. PHOTO BY DEREK LACEY

A new, Mint Hill-based farmer’s market is bringing a fresh way to support local farmers and local nonprofits to the Charlotte area.

Founders Nick Knock and Leconte Lee combined their passions of health and public service to create go-go fresco, a new kind of farmer’s market.

Go-go fresco brings fresh produce from local farms like Barbee Farms and The Farm at Dover Vineyards to sell at different locations around Charlotte, with a portion of the proceeds benefitting local nonprofits like Habitat for Humanity and Charlotte Rescue Mission.

The idea came to Knock as he was riding his bike to the coffee shop one day, and from there it snowballed into a new take on both charity and produce.

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