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Mint Hill, Mecklenburg resolve fire tax overpayment

By Derek Lacey / Staff Writer

Mint Hill town staff and Mecklenburg County staff have come to an agreement to remedy the overpayment made by the County for the fire service district tax.

The solution would defray the approximately $176,000 overpayment made to the town from the county, due to a miscalculation in projected tax revenue from Mint Hill’s extraterritorial jurisdiction, or ETJ, which the county estimated at $500,000, but which turned out to be only around $276,000.

The overpayment would be defrayed against a payment of $175,000 which was made to the county by the town a few years ago, to keep the Mint Hill branch library afloat.

Both Bobbie Shields, interim Mecklenburg County manager and Brian Welch, Mint Hill town manager, have been authorized to enter into the agreement to defray the payment by their respective boards.

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By |July 3rd, 2013|Around Town|2 Comments

BOC hears presentations on roundabout, fire tax

The Mint Hill Board of Commissioners and Mint Hill residents were updated on two important town issues at the meeting last Thursday, May 9.

Scott Cole, Division Traffic Engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation gave a presentation about roundabouts, and specifically the proposed roundabout to be built at the intersection of N.C. Hwy. 51 and Idlewild Road in Mint Hill.

Cole cited the main concerns for the construction of the roundabout, the same as the main concerns for any roundabout, are traffic efficiency and safety.

According to Cole, roundabouts are the safest intersection, can provide for high capacity and low delay, is good for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, motorcycles, bicycles, cars, and large trucks, has a geometric flexibility to fit in any location, and the aesthetic appeal.

For safety, Cole said that a regular intersection has 32 conflict points, or places where a collision is likely to occur, and that a roundabout has only 8, and provides for slower speeds and better angles.

Cole said that typical crash reductions following installation of roundabouts in rural areas of the United States could be as high as 74 percent.

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By |May 19th, 2013|Around Town|4 Comments