Armed Forces Museum documentary wins award

Armed Forces Museum & Archives of the Carolinas Documentary Wins Award
Mint Hill, October 21, 2013 — The Armed Forces Museum & Archives of the Carolinas’ (AFMAC) documentary honoring ex-prisoners of war is the recipient of the Paul Green Multimedia award presented by The North Carolina Society of Historians.
The winning video, entitled Honoring Our Heroes -The American POW Experience. WWII 1939-1949, is a 30-minute broadcast-quality documentary about the POW experience and is dedicated to honoring, preserving, and sharing the courage and sacrifices of WWII heroes, many of whom live in our community.
At their annual awards banquet on October 19, NCSH president Elizabeth Sherrill presented AFMAC president Bill Dixon with the award. Accepting the award with Dixon were Roger Reimann from Zoma Communications and Lisa Jillani, AFMAC’s media director.
One judge said of the video, “After watching this video, one word comes to mind – Awesome! It was amazing and touched the heart. On a scale of 1-100, we rate this film a 200.”
The North Carolina Society of Historians was established in December 1941 for the purpose of collecting, preserving, and perpetuating North Carolina’s rich history and for recognizing those persons who fulfill the Society’s objectives.
The motto and vision of AFMAC, a 501(c)(3) entity, is to honor, preserve and celebrate freedom.
This world-class museum will be unique in that it will honor all five branches of the United States military:  Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard. When completed, visitors will experience an educational showcase of 250 years of military history combined with the home front support and sacrifices that have made our nation great.
Details and donation information can be seen at VisitAFMAC.org.
Videos may be purchased for $25, which includes postage and shipping.

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Korean War Veterans Memorial dedication set for late fall

[simple_slideshow] The dedication ceremony for the Korean War Veterans Memorial has been postponed.  Originally set for July 27 in honor of the 1953 armistice, the ceremony will be some time in November.  A final date has not yet been set; organizers are trying to plan around Veterans Day events.

Some festivities will take place as scheduled for July 27.  A Korean children’s choir is set to perform, and colonels from South Korea and the mayor will be present.

The center fountain is near completion.  The water tank is being manufactured to recycle its water and fit in the fountain.

“It’s a work of art, believe me,” said Don Putnum of the Korean War Veterans Association.

They continue to raise funds for the project, which costs $150,000.  Two-thirds of that cost is a loan, leaving the other $50,000 to cover granite, plumbing, electrical work, and brickwork.  The main setback is the granite for the flooring.

“We’ve come a long way,” said Putnum.  Professionals he talked to in the field are surprised at how quickly they have managed to turn their plans of a memorial into a reality.  “It should take 10-12 years to do what we did in six.”

The memorial broke ground June 2010.  Since then, granite blocks for the main sign and dedicated pavers have been engraved, brick walls have been built, and pillars and statues have been erected.

This work honors the 789 North Carolinians who were killed or missing in action during the Korean War.  The memorial is built to “ensure that the soldier’s sacrifice will always be remembered,” and to commemorate what is called the “forgotten war.”

Adjacent to the KVWM will be the Armed Forces Museum and Archives of the Carolinas.  It will showcase the five branches of the United States military: Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard.  The museum will cover 250 years of military history through artifacts and interactive learning, an much of the history will focus on the Carolinas.

Like the KVWM, AFMAC is selling granite pavers to honor a veteran or a member of the armed forces, and to support the museum.  Pavers range in size, and prices start at $200.  The museum is expected to break ground in 2014.

Photos by Amanda Waters.

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AFMAC documentary

The Armed Forces Museum & Archives of the Carolinas (AFMAC) will present a documentary entitled Honoring Our Heroes- The American POW Experience. WWII 1939-1949 honoring ex-prisoners of war at two venues: Friday, June 1 at 7:30 pm at St. Sarkis Armenian Church, 7000 Park Road, Charlotte and Wednesday, June 6 at Matthews Community Center, 100 McDowell St., Matthews.  The time has not been determined. Light refreshments will be served.  The video is a 30-minute broadcast-quality documentary about the POW experience and is dedicated to honoring, preserving, and sharing the courage and sacrifices of our local WWII heroes, many of whom live in our community.

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AFMAC honors ex-POWs with movie

The Armed Forces Museum & Archives of the Carolinas (AFMAC) will present a documentary honoring ex-prisoners of war at three venues. On Saturday, May 26, at the Mint Hill Historical Society’s Ashcraft Schoolhouse, 7601 Matthews-Mint Hill Road, showings are at 9:30 am and 10:30 am (space is limited). Other showings are Saturday, May 26, at 3 pm at the Morrison Regional Library and Wednesday, May  30, at 7 pm at the South Charlotte Banquet Center, 9009 Bryant Farms Road. All showings are free and open to the public.
The video, entitled Honoring Our World War II Heroes—The American POW Experience, is a 30-minute broadcast-quality documentary about the POW experience and is dedicated to honoring, preserving, and sharing the courage and sacrifices of our local WWII heroes, many of whom live in our community.
AFMAC, a museum scheduled to break ground in Mint Hill in 2014, will be unique in that it will honor all five branches of the United States military: Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard. When completed, visitors will experience an educational showcase of 250 years of military history combined with the home front support and sacrifices. Details and donation information can be seen at VisitAFMAC.org.

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