Producer has Mint Hill roots

Free movie screening at Blair Road United Methodist

movieSeason of Miracles, the latest movie from Elevating Entertainment, has an official release date of October 1, but Blair Road United Methodist Church will host an early release screening of the new family friendly movie on September 13 at 7:00 pm. This is the third feature film produced by Mint Hill native Dave Moody and his son Josh.

Season of Miracles tells the story of the Robins, an underdog Little League team in the deep south who turn their season around when newcomer and autistic baseball savant, Rafer (Grayson Russell, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Talladega Nights) joins their team.  Continue reading

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Mint Hill represented at Matthews Alive

Matthews alive 1

Pottery 51 artisan Althea Meade- Hadjuk wraps up a sale for a customer Saturday. Right: The Independence High School marching band, under the direc- tion of Christopher Moreau, was a crowd pleaser.

Pottery 51 artisan Althea Meade- Hadjuk wraps up a sale for a customer Saturday. Right: The Independence High School marching band, under the direc- tion of Christopher Moreau, was a crowd pleaser.

The crowds were out at Matthews Alive, the annual Labor Day weekend family arts and crafts festival in down- town Matthews that draws more than 200,000 attendees each year and con- tinues to grow. Independence High School, Blessed Assurance and the Matthews-Mint Hill Indian Guides marched in the parade. Local potter Althea Meade-Hadjuk was one of the featured artists in the Hendrick Arts and Crafts Pavilion, and artist Bar- bara Travell’s work was exhibited in the new McDowell Arts Center.

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Relay for Life hits the ground running

Relay for Life of Matthews-Mint Hill is off to a running start in their 2013 fundraising season.
Scheduled this year for May 17 at the Park on Fairview, Relay for Life is the signature fundraising event for the American Cancer Society, an overnight event where teams share in constantly walking laps to symbolize the nonstop fight against cancer.
Local groups and businesses organize teams and raise funds to support ACS, selling products and walking laps throughout the event. 
The relay starts with a Survivor Lap, to honor cancer survivors, and a Luminaria Ceremony is held at dark to honor those that have fought cancer.
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2012: The Year in Review

JANUARY

 

Stinson-Wesley takes District 6 school board seat

 

At the beginning of 2012, Rev. Amelia Stinson-Wesley filled the District 6 seat left open by Tim Morgan. Stinson-Wesley was one of 12 candidates vying for the position, and was sworn in on January 10. She serves as director of World Connections for Women, a foundation she established in 1998.

 

New year, new laws

 

The beginning of 2012 saw changes to laws concerning everything from healthcare systems to gun laws. New laws provide incentives for physicians to organize Accountable Care organizations, North Carolina adopted standard deductions and personal exemptions, new energy conservation codes, new gun laws, and laws requiring employers to report new hires.

 

Independence senior wins writing prize

 

Erin Mullins, then a senior at Independence, won first prize in the eighteenth Martin Luther King Jr. Writing and Art Awards, part of a number of awards presented by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools and the MLK Jr. Citywide Committee. The theme was “Defending the Dream,” and students competed first at the school level, then district level.

 

New CMS starting times

 

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools estimated that they will save more than $600,000 for the 2012-2013 school year by changing their bell schedule, at 10 schools. The effort was to use a tiered method of scheduling, in order to offer the same transportation services, but with 15 fewer buses.

 

Mint Hill resident named recruiter of the year

 

Aviation Structural Mechanic First Class Robert Orzescu, who lives in Mint Hill, was named the Raleigh Navy ROTC Enlisted Recruiter of the Year. Orzescu became a recruiter in 2009, and since has won the NRD Raleigh NROTC Enlisted Recruiter of the Year two years in a row, and also claimed the 2011 Warrior Challenge Recruiter of the Year.

 

Judges rule on redistricting

 

A three-judge panel decided that the May 8, 2012 primary votes stood as scheduled, despite a lawsuit challenging new legislative and congressional voting districts. Challengers were hoping that primaries be moved to July 9, in order to further discuss the new districts, which support Republicans. The districts were upheld, and served through primaries and the general election.

 

FEBRUARY

 

Local author signs books

 

Mint Hill author Ed Galloway, writer of Incident in Mint Hill, sold and signed the book at The Hill Restaurant in Mint Hill, February 8. The audiobook, which Galloway produced himself, is a story about “a strange object that falls from the sky and causes an entire golfing community to go into a 24-hour blackout. No cable TV. No phone coverage. And all while being surrounded by military and government personnel,” said Galloway.

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Local towns discuss economic park options

Town Manager Brian Welch speaks at the October 3 called meeting of the commissioners of Mint Hill, Indian Trail, Matthews, and Stallings. PHOTO BY DEREK LACEY

On October 3, commissioners from Mint Hill, Matthews, Indian Trail, and Stallings met to discuss the potential advantages of grouping together to further economic initiatives in the community by establishing an economic partnership between the towns.

Presentations were given on how partnerships are planned, built, and managed, what advantages they offer to the communities involved, and how that could possibly benefit the four municipalities.

No action was taken at the meeting, but the idea of such a collaboration was discussed and action could be taken in the future.

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Becoming a certified Community Wildlife Habitat

The Town of Matthews is working with Habitat and Wildlife Keepers to become a certified Community Wildlife Habitat.  Matthews will become the fourth community in N.C. to become certified.  Weaverville, Montreat, and Lake Norman are already certified.

HAWK is a chapter of National Wildlife Federation.  This chapter, founded by Carol Buie-Jackson, now the N.C. Wildlife Federation vice president, was the first of its kind in the country, and North Carolina is the only state supported by a chapter system.

The Matthews initiative includes the zip codes 28104, 28105, and 28106.  Communities have five years after registering, and Matthews has one year left.  Certification works on a point system, and Matthews has only 56 points left.  Homes add one point, schools five points, and businesses and parks are three points.

Butler High School, Crestdale Middle School, and Matthews Elementary School are certified.  HAWK is now asking daycare centers and places of worship if they will participate.  The Four Mile Creek Greenway in Matthews is certified, as well as Squirrel Lake Park.

Residents can certify their homes by filling out a NWF application at gardenforwildlife.org.  Property must provide food, water, shelter, and a place to raise young for wildlife.  It is best to provide native plants and trees, as they are better sources for native wildlife.  Water can be as simple as a birdbath.  Birdhouses, shrubs, brush piles, and snags can be places for wildlife to raise young.  Certification costs $20, and a certification sign can be purchased for $30.

Jill Palmer, HAWK president, said Matthews town representatives have been supportive of this effort.  Having the town certified will “recognize the community as a place that cares about wildlife.”

“We’re pretty nature- and eco-friendly in Matthews,” said Palmer.  “This just gives us that right to say this is a community that cares about wildlife.”  She said certification will be attractive to residents and businesses looking for a place to settle down.

Palmer expects HAWK to eventually branch out beyond Matthews into surrounding areas like Mint Hill.  If Mint Hill residents or businesses have questions about certification or general wildlife concerns, HAWK will gladly answer them.

“We do it because we love nature, we love animals.  We care about the environment,” said Palmer.

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