Election decides commissioners, school board

By Michele Dotson    dotson.michele@minthilltimes.com

Screen Shot 2013-10-31 at 2.09.32 PMAll eligible citizens should exercise their right to vote. Make your vote count by casting your ballot for Mint Hill Commissioner (you will get to vote for four), mayor (Mayor Biggers is running unopposed), and one school board member.

In an effort to bring the past few months’ worth of campaigning into focus before heading to the polls on November 5, here is a brief review of the candidates.

Mayor Ted Biggers is running unopposed. He was first elected mayor on 1999 and has overseen the transformation of Mint Hill’s steady and constant growth, fought for one high school for Mint Hill students, led the formation of the Mint Hill Police department and was instrumental in bringing in a town manager. Continue reading

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MH Women’s Club to hold meet the candidates forum

By Michele Dotson

  The campaign signs are out all over Mint Hill as candidates vie for positions as commissioners and School Board members. The election will be held on November 5. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON


The campaign signs are out all over Mint Hill as candidates vie for positions as commissioners and School Board members. The election will be held on November 5. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

The Mint Hill Women’s Club will hold a candidates forum and question and answer session for residents on Monday, October 14 at the Mint Hill Town Hall. The event will run from 7-8 pm. Citizens will get the chance to learn more about candidates for Mint Hill Mayor, Board of Commissioners and District 6 School Board.  

Most of the 13 candidates have committed to be present for the forum, which will be followed up by a question and answer session. Audience members will be given index cards for their questions and candidates will answer as many questions as possible in the time permitted.
Moderation will be provided by The League of Women Voters.  
At 7 pm the meeting will open with comments from Bettie Ann Haynes from Charlotte-Mecklenburg League of Women Voters. Candidates will have the opportunity to speak for up to two minutes each.
Then a Question and answer session will be facilitated by Haynes and questions will continue until 8 pm.
Mayor Ted Biggers, running unopposed, has committed to attending the event.
Candidates for the Board of Commissioners that have positively responded to the invitation include Lloyd Austin, Dale Dalton, Carl “Mickey” Ellington, Rich Ferretti, Harry Marsh, Brenda McRae, Richard “Fig” Newton, and Katrina “Tina” Ross. At press time, there had been no response from Eric Random.
Responding candidates for School Board District 6 are Paul Bailey and Bolyn McClung. 
At press time, there had not been a response from Doug Wrona.
Mint Hill Town Hall is located at 4430 Mint Hill Village Lane. 
The meeting will be in the Assembly Room.
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2012 North Carolina Election Results

President

Barack Obama (D)

President Obama won reelection in a convincing victory, clinching 336 electoral votes and 50 percent of the popular vote, wining all swing states except North Carolina, while Republican challenger Mitt Romney secured only 206 electoral votes and 48 percent of the popular vote. In North Carolina, the percentages were reversed, with Romney winning 50.4 percent of the popular vote, while Obama secured 48.3 percent.

US House of Representatives

Robert Pittenger (R)

Republican Robert Pittenger narrowly secured election, replacing the retiring incumbent Sue Myrick, and taking 51.8 percent of the vote in the three-county area that includes Mecklenburg, Union, and Gaston counties. Democrat Jennifer Roberts won 45.7 percent of the vote, and Independent Curtis Campbell won 2.6.

Governor

Pat McCrory (R)

Former Charlotte mayor Republican Pat McCrory secured the North Carolina governor’s race, defeating Democratic challenger Walter Dalton by 11.5 percentage points. McCrory won the race with 54.7 percent, and Dalton won 43.2. Libertarian candidate Barbara Howe took 2.1 percent of the vote.

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Meet the candidates for Mint Hill Mayor

Mint Hill will vote for a mayor again on November 8. There are two candidates—present mayor Ted Biggers and local business owner,  Jean Bonner. A mayor sets the pace for the board and presides over meetings. The mayor also cast votes if there is a tie between the commissioners. Continue reading

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Tim Morgan officially announces at-large bid

 

 

Mint Hill Times

Tim Morgan will challenge for one of the three at-large seats on the board of education. Photo by Tim Long

 

Tim Morgan officially announced last Thursday that he will run for an at-large seat on the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools’ Board of Education. Morgan has served two years on the board for District 6 which comprises Mint Hill, Matthews and South Charlotte.
Morgan, a graduate of Independence High School, said that if he wins, it could be a win-win for the southeastern portions of Mecklenburg County. That’s because the board would have to appoint someone to take over the District 6 seat he currently occupies, giving Mint Hill and the rest of the southeastern Mecklenburg County two representatives on the board of education.
A crowd of reporters, Morgan’s family, and supporters including Charlotte City Council members Warren Cooksey and Andy Dulin, attended Morgan’s press conference in front of the government building in downtown Charlotte Thursday. Morgan said the top priority for the next school board will be selecting a new superintendent to replace Peter Gorman who announced his departure in early June.
“Hiring a superintendent will be the most important decision this board makes,” he said. Continue reading
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Myrick votes to repeal health care law

In a largely symbolic act, Rep. Sue Myrick voted yesterday to repeal the health care law that was passed last year. Myrick represents the Mint Hill area in the U.S. House of Representatives. The law has surprisingly become more favorable to the American people according to recent polls.

Thirty-nine percent believe the health plan that Obama signed into law last year is a good idea, versus another 39 percent who think it’s a bad idea.

But those saying it’s a good idea is at its highest level since September 2009, and those saying it’s a bad idea is at its lowest level since June 2009.

The poll also finds that 46 percent of respondents are opposed to repeal (with 34 percent strongly opposed), while 45 percent support the repeal effort (with 35 percent strongly in favor).

Yet, a majority of the House still voted in favor of repeal. The bill has little if any chance of passing the Senate.

“There’s a lot in this law that I’m against,” Myrick said. “It’s going to cost us more jobs. It’s a nightmare for our deficit. It will negatively impact doctor-patient relationships with more regulations. The individual mandate to purchase insurance violates the Commerce Clause of the US Constitution.”

“By repealing this law, we can go back to the drawing board and work on things that will lower the cost of health care, like allowing insurers to sell coverage across state lines, making coverage portable, addressing medical liability reform, and improving health insurance high-risk pools so that those with pre-existing conditions can get coverage. These are things on which the public agrees, and we should work together, as Americans, to make sure that we truly reform our health care system.”

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