Mint Hill Volunteer Fire Department to charge for ambulance service

Mint Hill Volunteer Fire Department representative Roger Martin shares the findings of the long- range study completed in January. Martin demonstrates the need for additional personnel that will be funded by charging for ambulance service. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

Mint Hill Volunteer Fire Department representative Roger Martin shares the findings of the long- range study completed in January. Martin demonstrates the need for additional personnel that will be funded by charging for ambulance service. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

At the August 15 Board of Commissioners meeting, representatives from the Mint Hill VFD made a presentation outlining a plan to move forward with billing for ambulance service. This plan is an effort for the service to become self-sustaining.
MHVFD Chairman Jerry Mullis addressed the Board to explain the findings of a study initiated in January to determine long-range needs of the department based on the steady increase of call volume due to population increases in the Mint Hill area.
“All indications are that our call load will increase each year,” says Mullis. “We need to be proactive in our readiness and future abilities to serve.” Continue reading

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Blair Road United Methodist welcomes new associate pastor

Screen Shot 2013-07-17 at 7.21.24 PMBy Michele Dotson-Staff Writer

Pastor Innocent Justice is settling into his new role at Blair Road United Methodist Church. Justice comes to Mint Hill from Durham where he has just completed his Master’s in Divinity from Duke University.

Originally from Rwanda, Justice thinks his mother had high hopes of his future in the ministry by picking such a fitting name.

“My mother, who was a good Catholic, looked in the books of the Saints and she chose Innocent. Maybe she thought I was going to serve the Lord,” he says.

If there was any doubt that his first name might allude to his future calling, there is no question about his last name.

“In African culture, there are no such things as a family last name,” he explains. “So when I was born, I was given the last name Ndagijimana, which means ‘God is my Shepherd.’”

Justice fled the genocide in Rwanda to the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1994, only to be chased back into the country when the atrocities began in the refugee camps there. In 2001 he fled to South Africa with his wife and daughter and remained there until 2005.

“I came to the US with my wife and daughter to Kentucky,” says Justice. “We were sponsored there by Wesley United Methodist Church and I knew then that God had called me to the ministry.”

Justice completed his BA in Pastoral Ministry at John Wesley College, which is now Laurel University. In 2010 he applied and was admitted to Duke Divinity School. He served as Associate Student Pastor at Duke’s Chapel in Durham from July, 2010 to June 9, 2013.

2010 also marked another milestone for Justice and his family. They became US citizens.

“In Africa, wives don’t take the last name of their husbands. So when we came here, I would go to the school to pick up the children, they would ask if they were adopted since my wife, children, and I had different last names; it caused such confusion,” explained Justice.

So when they became citizens in 2010, they decided to choose a last name that was appropriate for them.

“Because of my passion for justice and reconciliation, I chose the last name “Justice.”

“We are happy in this country, but it was important to remember where we came from, so I did not lose my last name, Ndagijimana became my middle name.”

Upon completion of his degree at Duke, Justice began to look into positions at specific churches and started interviewing. Churches in need then submit their top two candidates to the Conference for approval. Even though he was from Durham, Justice is a member of the Western Conference.

“The Bishop and the Cabinet will sit together to pray and discern and decide which church needs who, with the gifts and Grace, as we call them, and they decide the appointments,” explains Justice.

“God wanted me to be here, and here I am,” he adds.

As associate pastor, Justice will assist Senior Pastor Lynn Upchurch in many ways.

“My responsibilities will involve teaching, preaching and pastoral care, and all the life of the church,” he says. He’s very excited about the possibilities at the church and is working now to get to know the congregation as well as prepare for his first sermon which will be July 21.

The family has grown since leaving Africa and now includes two more daughters.

“My wife Vicky, and daughters Divine, Deborah, and Dianna are really loving Mint Hill,” he says. “It is a wonderful place. I love Mint Hill because it’s a small town. It’s very calm. You can access everything and it’s not far from Charlotte. I can drive 20 minutes and I am in the big city, and then come back here to this safe sanctuary, so I love Mint Hill.”

 

 

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Mint Hill Board of Commissioners hears plans on development

Before the normal Mint Hill Board of commissioners meeting last Thursday, January 10, the town held their quarterly developer’s workshop, hearing presentations from several area land developers.

The board heard from Jerry Helms regarding Blair Road Development, Chris Isaacs regarding Mint Hill Commons development, and Brian Jackson regarding modifications to the Summerwood Community’s architecture requirements. 

Helms presented preliminary plans for an area of land owned by a number of residents, and potential uses for the land include a retirement community and a retail shopping space.
“I’m afraid if we develop Lawyer’s Road, we develop 218, we develop Blair Road, it’s going to turn Mint Hill and the outer belt into a nightmare,” said Mint Hill Mayor Ted Biggers, speaking of the potential development for a retail shopping complex along 485 in Mint Hill. “So at this point, I’m not encouraging this project. I think there are components of it that may be viable down the road, but this project is one big project that  I’m just not encouraged by.”
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Mint Hill Board of Commissioners hears plans on development

Before the normal Mint Hill Board of commissioners meeting last Thursday, January 10, the town held their quarterly developer’s workshop, hearing presentations from several area land developers.

The board heard from Jerry Helms regarding Blair Road Development, Chris Isaacs regarding Mint Hill Commons development, and Brian Jackson regarding modifications to the Summerwood Community’s architecture requirements. 
Helms presented preliminary plans for an area of land owned by a number of residents, and potential uses for the land include a retirement community and a retail shopping space.
“I’m afraid if we develop Lawyer’s Road, we develop 218, we develop Blair Road, it’s going to turn Mint Hill and the outer belt into a nightmare,” said Mint Hill Mayor Ted Biggers, speaking of the potential development for a retail shopping complex along 485 in Mint Hill. “So at this point, I’m not encouraging this project. I think there are components of it that may be viable down the road, but this project is one big project that  I’m just not encouraged by.”
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DaVita Dialysis comes to Mint Hill

DaVita Dialysis, a national Fortune 500 company with nearly 2,000 U.S. locations, opened a new facility in Mint Hill, located on Hawthorne Drive.

DaVita, which was founded in 1999, now serves about 150,000 patients and 41,000 employees nationwide.

The Mint Hill location opened November 5, and in the little more than two months of operation, is serving 19 patients with a staff of 11 people, all experienced in dialysis treatment, and they are currently looking to hire another nurse.

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Korean War Veterans’ Memorial nears completion

Two and a half years since the groundbreaking ceremony and beginning of construction of the NC Korean War Veterans Memorial in the Park on Fairview, construction is 85 percent complete.

The granite sign was first, then came the footings and construction of the four-foot tall brick wall planter, topped with 80 green boxwood plants.

Plumbing PCV lines were laid, connecting the fountain in the center of the memorial and the irrigation system to the planter and trees. A 1,000-gallon tank to supply the water has been buried and is ready to be hooked up to the main water supply line. Electrical conduit lines to the in-ground lighting throughout the memorial are ready for wiring to the control panel. A six-inch concrete flooring was poured and an additional amount of concrete was added on four sections in the center that will be covered with Astroturf. Two life-size granite statues, one dressed in a poncho and the other in class A uniform, stand guard at the four 14-foot tall granite pylons with the names of the 788 men from North Carolina who were killed or are listed as missing in action during the Korean War.

 

Loads of four-inch granite slabs were placed starting at the sign and moving down into and through the memorial. On many of the slabs are more than 400 engraved memorial pavers remembering and honoring “veterans of all wars.” Stainless steel handrails have been manufactured and await installation on the two handicap ramps leading to the fountain and Hallowed area of the memorial. The center is the water fountain with the South Korean flag, the “Taeguk,” colored in red and blue with fiber-optic lighting at night.

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