Butler HS opens Academy of Health SciencesB

By Leah Schmalz

Last Thursday, during freshman orientation, Butler High School held an open house for the inaugural year of its Academy of Health Science.

“We are one of two Health Science Academies through National Academic Foundation

in the state of North Carolina so we’re really excited,” said Ann Marie Ferguson, Assistant Principal of Instruction and the administrator of the academy.

At the open house, students had the opportunity to experience some of the experiments and activities that will

be part of their regular academy classes. During the school year, students will follow a curriculum that prepares them for paid internships in health sciences by junior year.

“Right now about 50 percent of kids that have signed up for courses in the academy are looking into veterinary medicine,” said Ferguson. “We’re hoping to get some internships with vets in the area.”

The students also will take college level courses for credit by junior year. Each Monday students will hear from guest speakers or take field trips.

This year there were no restrictions in place to sign up for the academy. In following years, there will be a 100-student cap on the program. Ferguson said the school will see how the first year goes before determining how to set the cap or if there is a need for more teachers.

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Local youth raises funds for police K-9 Unit

Landon Weyenberg (center) poses with K-9 Officer Billy Gilman (left) dog Ivy and Officer Robbie Owens (right) with Blitz. Photo courtesy of Angela Weyenberg.

Landon Weyenberg (center) poses with K-9 Officer Billy Gilman (left) dog Ivy and Officer Robbie Owens (right) with Blitz. Photo courtesy of Angela Weyenberg.

By Charles Kelleher Harris

When most of think of those who protect and serve, we imagine them standing on two legs. But some of the greatest assets to law enforcement agencies around the world work on four legs.

Recently the Mint Hill Police Department acquired too such crime fighters.

Blitz and Ivy are Dutch German Shepherds trained specifically to assist police in a variety of areas.

“We use them for tracking, trailing, appre- hension and evidence searches,” said Mint Hill Police Officer Robbie Owens who along with Officer Billy Gilman manages the K-9 unit.

Since the K-9s are often placed in precarious situations, their protection is important.

To that end, a Charlotte boy decided to make things a little safer for Blitz and Ivy.

“I care for the dogs that help us in everyday situations,” said 12 year- old Landon Weyenberg, “I wanted to be sure that these dogs, were better protected, as they work to protect us.

Weyenberg decided that he would hold a fundraiser to help purchase bullet proof vests for Blitz and Ivy.

Weyenberg said that after hearing about Mint Hill PD’s recent K- 9 acquisition, he called Chief Tim Ledford and inquired about K-9 vests. Ledford explained that the purchase was costly, around $800 per vest.

With the help of his parents, Weyenberg created a fundraising site at CROWDRISE.com. Word spread quickly and in only four days $1,800 was raised.

“It was truly a testament to how giving people can really be,” said Landon’s mom

Angela, “Of course it makes me proud that my 12 year old son chose to do something of this nature, in order to help with a need for one of our local communities. But what makes it really great was that he chose something that he is passionate about…dogs!”

Landon, who attends Hickory Grove Christian School, hopes that his efforts will help inspire others to follow in his footsteps.

Meanwhile Angela said that the entire family has been motivated.

“This project has given our whole family reasons to continue this cause,” she said.

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Mint Hill Lions Club shows appreciation

Mint Hill Lion’s Club President Alan Mckenize presents a check to Sydney Eudy for a VIP Fishing trip. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MINT HILL LIONS CLUB

Mint Hill Lion’s Club President Alan Mckenize presents a check to Sydney Eudy for a VIP Fishing trip. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MINT HILL LIONS CLUB

It was a night of appreciation and a time to say thank you at the Mint Hill Lions Club regular meeting last Tuesday. The club hon- ored Janelle Smith and Tonya Eudy, manager and co-manager of the Mint Hill BiLo for their tireless work.

The club also thanked Billy Kiser for his support of the club and with his donations and assistance at the annual car show held in the BiLo parking lot.

Alan McKenize, president of the Mint Hill Lions Club, presented

a $600 check donation to Sydney Eudy for the VIP fishing trip to the Outer Banks, where sight impaired individuals experience ocean fishing.

The funds will assist them for the next trip where prizes are given out for the largest catch and the most fish caught.

The Mint Hill Lions Club meets the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, except dur- ing July and August.

All meetings begin at 7 pm and take place at Jimmies Restaurant on Matthews-Mint Hill Road.

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10th Annual afternoon in the park to be held

By Charles Kelleher Harris

In 2004 Mint Hill Commissioner Tina Ross wanted an opportunity for local artist to showcase their talents and skills, while interacting with locals. To that end she helped organized the very first Afternoon in the Park.

“The afternoon event adds to cultural landscape,” said Ross, “[It allows] area residents to see art and interact with artists in a wonderful, free outdoor setting.” Continue reading

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Back-To-School

Pick up a copy of our Back-To-School issue on stands now!

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Butler High School to hold orientation for inaugural Academy of Health Sciences

By Leah Schmalz

 On Thursday, August 14, during freshman orientation, Butler High School will hold an open house for the inaugural year of its Academy of Health Science. “We are one of two Health Science Academies through National Academic Foundation in the state of North Carolina so we’re really excited,” said Ann Marie Ferguson, Assistant Principal of Instruction and the administrator of the academy.

 At the open house, students will have the opportunity to experience some of the experiments and activities that will be part of their regular academy classes. During the school year, students will follow a curriculum that prepares them for paid internships in health sciences by junior year. “Right now about 50% of kids that have signed up for courses in the academy are looking into veterinary medicine,” said Ferguson. “We’re hoping to get some internships with vets in the area.” The students will also be taking college level courses for credit by junior year. Each Monday students will hear from guest speakers or take field trips.

 This year there were no restrictions in place to sign up for the academy. In following years, there will be a 100-student cap on the program. Ferguson said the school will see how the first year goes before determining how to set the cap or if there is a need for more teachers.

 

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