Shred event set for Sunday

By Michele Dotson
Identify theft is a problem across the nation and it is important to protect your personal information at all times. According to the State’s Attorney General’s office, about 300,000 people in North Carolina become victims of identity theft annually. 
Many of these cases can be prevented by shredding personal documents instead of throwing them away in the trash can.
The Charlotte area is one of the two North Carolina cities that rank in the top 100 metropolitan areas for identity theft complaints; the other is Fayetteville.
The public is urged to attend the free Community Shred Event on Saturday, October 12 from 9 am to noon at the McEwen Shopping Center, which is located at the corner of Hwy 51 and Lawyers Road.
The event is sponsored by the Mint Hill Chamber of Commerce and the Mint Hill Police Department.
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Mint Hill Cruise in: Great car, great stories

By Michele Dotson

Michael and Becky Smith displayed their 1960 Ford Starling at the October 4 Cruise-in in Mint Hill. The Smith’s are pictured here with their grandson Jacob Tucker. PHOTOS BY MICHELE DOTSON

Michael and Becky Smith displayed their 1960 Ford Starling at the October 4 Cruise-in in Mint Hill. The Smith’s are pictured here with their grandson Jacob Tucker. PHOTOS BY MICHELE DOTSON

The weather was beautiful, the cars streamed in and the last Cruise-in of 2013 was held on Friday, October 4 in the Monroe Hardware parking lot in Mint Hill. The monthly event, which is held the first Friday night from April through October from 6-9 pm, helps to raise money for Special Olympics.

“We have done real well this year,” says organizer Ronnie Theroux. “We’ve had a real good turn out and have seem some new cars.”
Ronnie and wife Vicenta work with the Special Olympics where they are coaches for softball. They work with adults and their season begins in February, with Regionals beginning in June in Cabarrus County. Continue reading
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MH Women’s Club to hold meet the candidates forum

By Michele Dotson

  The campaign signs are out all over Mint Hill as candidates vie for positions as commissioners and School Board members. The election will be held on November 5. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON


The campaign signs are out all over Mint Hill as candidates vie for positions as commissioners and School Board members. The election will be held on November 5. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

The Mint Hill Women’s Club will hold a candidates forum and question and answer session for residents on Monday, October 14 at the Mint Hill Town Hall. The event will run from 7-8 pm. Citizens will get the chance to learn more about candidates for Mint Hill Mayor, Board of Commissioners and District 6 School Board.  

Most of the 13 candidates have committed to be present for the forum, which will be followed up by a question and answer session. Audience members will be given index cards for their questions and candidates will answer as many questions as possible in the time permitted.
Moderation will be provided by The League of Women Voters.  
At 7 pm the meeting will open with comments from Bettie Ann Haynes from Charlotte-Mecklenburg League of Women Voters. Candidates will have the opportunity to speak for up to two minutes each.
Then a Question and answer session will be facilitated by Haynes and questions will continue until 8 pm.
Mayor Ted Biggers, running unopposed, has committed to attending the event.
Candidates for the Board of Commissioners that have positively responded to the invitation include Lloyd Austin, Dale Dalton, Carl “Mickey” Ellington, Rich Ferretti, Harry Marsh, Brenda McRae, Richard “Fig” Newton, and Katrina “Tina” Ross. At press time, there had been no response from Eric Random.
Responding candidates for School Board District 6 are Paul Bailey and Bolyn McClung. 
At press time, there had not been a response from Doug Wrona.
Mint Hill Town Hall is located at 4430 Mint Hill Village Lane. 
The meeting will be in the Assembly Room.
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Former Bain students now working on staff

By Michele Dotson
Former Bain students Dorothy Flaherty, Kelli Drye, Tracy Mullis, Susan Moore and Jessica Corrigan have returned to their elementary alma mater as employees. Flaherty is the school’s administrative and financial secretary, Drye is the Instructional Facilitator, Mullis and Moore are both teaching assistants, and Corrigan teaches third grade. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

Former Bain students Dorothy Flaherty, Kelli Drye, Tracy Mullis, Susan Moore and Jessica Corrigan have returned to their elementary alma mater as employees. Flaherty is the school’s administrative and financial secretary, Drye is the Instructional Facilitator, Mullis and Moore are both teaching assistants, and Corrigan teaches third grade. PHOTO BY MICHELE DOTSON

Whoever said “Nothing good can last forever,” certainly had never attended Bain Elementary School.

Five current members of the Bain Elementary staff are former students.  What has drawn them back to Bain to work as adults is basically the same feelings they got when they were kids.
“The closeness that we have is like an extended family,” says Administrative and Financial Secretary Dorothy Flaherty who attended Bain from Kindergarten through sixth grade.
Third grade teacher Jessica Corrigan is proud to be at Bain to continue the traditions.
“The heart of Bain is what makes it so special.  There is a feeling of love and warmth amongst the staff, parents, and students.  We have strong historical ties to the community and Bain is rooted in a long tradition of providing the best for its students. “
Academic Facilitator Kelli Drye’s mother taught at Bain when she was a student there and she remembers spending time after school with her in her classroom “teaching school.”
Although Bain has been known since its inception in 1889 as a quality educational institution, holding high expectation of its students and parents, there’s always room for some fun, too. Continue reading
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