Gov. Bev Perdue today signed Executive Order No. 33 creating the North Carolina Complete Count Committee to coordinate Census activities at the state level. In addition, Gov. Perdue announced that 24,000 Census jobs will be available throughout North Carolina

The Census Bureau will be hiring for 24,000 jobs throughout North Carolina beginning in January 2010. Job seekers can find application information at www.2010censusjobs.gov or by calling 1-866-861-2010. The information is also available via the Employment Security Commission or JobsNOW.nc.gov. Some jobs will begin as early as January, while most will begin in February and March, and will extend until June or July.

“More than $400 billion in federal funds will be distributed each year based on the census count, so a complete count is critical to North Carolina,” Perdue said. “I urge everyone to fill out and mail back their Census forms. It’s easy, it’s important and it’s secure.”

The decennial census will take place on April 1, 2010. It is administered by the federal government, but requires support at the state and local level. The state’s activities are coordinated by the state’s Complete Count Committee (CCC). Individual localities also establish complete count committees, in order to coordinate participation in the census.

“The 2010 decennial census outreach effort in North Carolina is unprecedented,” said Dr. Nancy Potok, U.S. Commerce Department Deputy Under Secretary. “The Census form will be the shortest and easiest in history – ten questions that will take only ten minutes to complete, available in 59 different languages so that no one is left out. Here in North Carolina, we have also tripled the scope of our partnership program. By working with local community organizations and groups, we will empower North Carolinians to help ensure that everyone is counted.”

Over $400 billion in federal funds will be allocated annually based on the 2010 Census figures. Based on recent estimates, the state will receive approximately $14,000 in federal funding per person counted over the next 10 years. In addition, Census data is the basis for the NC State Demographer’s projections, which are used to determine the distribution of state funds.

The Census will also determine whether North Carolina will receive an additional seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. North Carolina narrowly received a 13th congressional district after the 2000 Census by margin of approximately 800 people.