Armed Robbery at Colonial Village Apartments in Mint Hill

Mint Hill Police were dispatched June 30 at 11:30 pm to an armed robbery that occurred in the PVA of 9624 Stoney Glen Drive at Colonial Village Apartments. Upon the officers arrival two male victims stated they were just robbed at gunpoint by two unknown black male subjects in the PVA.

The victims stated they returned home from work in their vehicle and parked in the PVA of the apartments. When they got out of the vehicle, two black males approached them in the front of the vehicle and demanded their wallets. The two subjects were dressed in black with their faces covered and were armed. The two subjects told the victims to get on the ground and give them their wallets.

The suspects took a wallet from both victims and left the area in a dark colored, small passenger vehicle. Mint Hill Officers attempted to locate the vehicle, but were unable to find the suspect vehicle in the vicinity.

Mint Hill Police are asking for assistance from anyone who may have information on this incident to contact police at 704-545-1085. After Hours please contact dispatch at 704-889-2231.

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One comment on “Armed Robbery at Colonial Village Apartments in Mint Hill
  1. Research has determined that from the Moment of Commitment (the point when a student pulls their weapon) to the Moment of Completion (when the last round is fired) is only 5 seconds. If it is the intent of a school district to react to this violence, they will do so over the wounded and/or slain bodies of students, teachers and administrators.

    Educational institutions clearly want safe and secure schools. Administrators are perennially queried by parents about the safety of their schools. The commonplace answers, intended to reassure anxious parents, focus on the school resource officers and emergency procedures. While useful, these less than adequate efforts do not begin to provide a definitive answer to preventing school violence, nor do they make a school safe and secure.

    Traditionally school districts have relied upon the mental health community or local police to keep schools safe, yet one of the key shortcomings has been the lack of a system that involves teachers, administrators, parents and students in the identification and communication process. Recently, colleges, universities and community colleges are forming Behavioral Intervention Teams with representatives from all these constituencies. Higher Education has changed their safety/security policies, procedures, or surveillance systems, yet K-12 have yet to incorporate Behavioral Intervention Teams. K-12 schools continue spending excessive amounts of money to put in place many of the physical security options. Sadly, they are reactionary only and do little to prevent aggression because they are designed exclusively to react to existing conflict, threat and violence. These schools reflect a national blindspot, which prefers hardening targets through enhanced security versus preventing violence with efforts directed at aggressors. Security gets all the focus and money, but this only makes us feel safe, rather than to actually make us safer.

    Some law enforcement agencies use profiling as a means to identify an aggressor. According to the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education’s report on Targeted Violence in Schools, there is a significant difference between “profiling” and identifying and measuring emerging aggression; “The use of profiles is not effective either for identifying students who may pose a risk for targeted violence at school or – once a student has been identified – for assessing the risk that a particular student may pose for school-based targeted violence.” It continues; “An inquiry should focus instead on a student’s behaviors and communications to determine if the student appears to be planning or preparing for an attack.” We can and must assess objective, culturally neutral, identifiable criteria of emerging aggression.

    For a comprehensive look at the problem and its solution, http://www.aggressionmanagement.com/White_Paper_K-12/

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